Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version
https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/mushrooms-pdq

The National Cancer Institute as the source and link to the original NCI product using the original product's title; e.g., “Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version was originally published by the National Cancer Institute.”

Medicinal mushrooms have been used for hundreds of years, mainly in Asian countries, for treatment of infections. More recently, they have also been used in the treatment of pulmonary diseases and cancer. Medicinal mushrooms have been approved adjuncts to standard cancer treatments in Japan and China for more than 30 years and have an extensive clinical history of safe use as single agents or combined with radiation therapy or chemotherapy.

More than 100 species of medicinal mushrooms are used in Asia. Some of the more commonly used species include Ganoderma lucidum (reishi), Trametes versicolor or Coriolus versicolor (turkey tail), Lentinus edodes (shiitake), and Grifola frondosa (maitake).

Studies have examined the effects of mushrooms on immune response pathways and on direct antitumor mechanisms. The immune effects are mediated through the mushroom's stimulation of innate immune cells, such as monocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells. The activity is generally considered to be caused by the presence of high-molecular-weight polysaccharides in the mushrooms, although other constituents may also be involved. Clinical trials in cancer patients have demonstrated that G. lucidum products are generally well tolerated.[1]

Many of the medical and scientific terms used in this summary are hypertext linked (at first use in each section) to the NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms, which is oriented toward nonexperts. When a linked term is clicked, a definition will appear in a separate window.

Reference citations in some PDQ cancer information summaries may include links to external websites that are operated by individuals or organizations for the purpose of marketing or advocating the use of specific treatments or products. These reference citations are included for informational purposes only. Their inclusion should not be viewed as an endorsement of the content of the websites, or of any treatment or product, by the PDQ Integrative, Alternative, and Complementary Therapies Editorial Board or the National Cancer Institute.

References

  1. Jin X, Ruiz Beguerie J, Sze DM, et al.: Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) for cancer treatment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 6: CD007731, 2012. [PUBMED Abstract]
  1. Turkey tail is a woody bracket polypore fungus that grows on dead logs worldwide. The scientific name of turkey tail is Trametes versicolor (L.) Lloyd, although it has been known by other names, notably Coriolus versicolor (L. ex Fr.) Quel. It is known as Yun Zhi in traditional Chinese medicine and Kawaratake (roof tile fungus) in Japan. The name turkey tail refers to its concentric rings of brown and tan, which resemble the tail feathers of a turkey.
  2. There are many other species of Trametes, some of which are difficult to distinguish from turkey tail. Internal transcribed spacer sequences alone have been found inadequate to distinguish turkey tail from other species of Trametes, so other molecular characters are required for that task.[1]

 

4.     History

  1. The fungus has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for many years to treat pulmonary diseases.[2,3] A purified hot water extract prepared from the cultivated fungal mycelium has been used in Japan for its immunomodulatory effects as an adjuvant treatment for cancer.[4-6] Polysaccharide-K (PSK) or krestin, from the mushroom versicolor, is an approved mushroom product used for cancer treatment in Japan. PSK is a proprietary formulation from the Kureha Corporation. PSK has been used as an adjunctive cancer treatment in thousands of patients since the mid-1970s. The safety record for PSK is well established in Japan. Few adverse events have been reported in patients treated with PSK. Polysaccharopeptide (PSP) is another extract from T. versicolor produced in China.
References
  1. Carlson A, Justo A, Hibbett DS: Species delimitation in Trametes: a comparison of ITS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1 gene phylogenies. Mycologia 106 (4): 735-45, 2014 Jul-Aug. [PUBMED Abstract]
  2. Ng TB: A review of research on the protein-bound polysaccharide (polysaccharopeptide, PSP) from the mushroom Coriolus versicolor (Basidiomycetes: Polyporaceae). Gen Pharmacol 30 (1): 1-4, 1998. [PUBMED Abstract]
  3. Ying J, Mao X, Ma Q, et al.: Icons of Medicinal Fungi from China. Beijing, China: Science Press, 1987.
  4. Tsukagoshi S, Hashimoto Y, Fujii G, et al.: Krestin (PSK). Cancer Treat Rev 11 (2): 131-55, 1984. [PUBMED Abstract]
  5. Cui J, Chisti Y: Polysaccharopeptides of Coriolus versicolor: physiological activity, uses, and production. Biotechnol Adv 21 (2): 109-22, 2003. [PUBMED Abstract]
  6. Sakagami H, Aoki T, Simpson A, et al.: Induction of immunopotentiation activity by a protein-bound polysaccharide, PSK (review). Anticancer Res 11 (2): 993-9, 1991 Mar-Apr. [PUBMED Abstract]

 

Views: 11

Have questions?

Need help? Visit our Support Group for help from our friendly Admins and members!

Have you?

Become a Member
Invited Your Friends
Made new Friends
Read/ Written a Blog
Joined/ Created a Group
Read/ Posted a Discussion
Checked out the Chat
Looked at/Posted Videos
Made a donation this month
Followed us on Twitter
Followed us on Facebook

Donations

Please consider a donation to help with our continued growth and site costs

Connect

Visit The Temple
on Facebook:

....

Blog Posts

Soulless Crew

Posted by Quingu on September 17, 2019 at 1:00pm 0 Comments

Because innernet

Posted by savlove on September 16, 2019 at 4:37pm 0 Comments

Faith

Posted by Quingu on September 13, 2019 at 3:42pm 0 Comments

The Roc Nation (Bloodline)

Posted by Quingu on September 13, 2019 at 12:30pm 0 Comments

The Bloodlines

Posted by Quingu on September 11, 2019 at 1:15pm 0 Comments

Sith Pureblood (Red Kingú)

Posted by Quingu on September 10, 2019 at 4:00pm 0 Comments

7th Heaven

Posted by Quingu on September 5, 2019 at 10:00am 0 Comments

Lord Kingù Nungal (The Death Angel)

Posted by Quingu on September 3, 2019 at 12:00pm 0 Comments

MAKE IT COUNT

Posted by Sky a.k.a. JD Aeon on September 3, 2019 at 9:30am 0 Comments

Air Born

Posted by Quingu on September 2, 2019 at 9:00am 0 Comments

Third Eye Blind

Posted by Quingu on September 2, 2019 at 2:02am 2 Comments

Ms. Glass

Posted by Quingu on August 28, 2019 at 2:35pm 0 Comments

The Hidden God (MOB/666)

Posted by Quingu on August 24, 2019 at 12:44pm 0 Comments

The Trinity

Posted by Quingu on August 20, 2019 at 12:30pm 6 Comments

Luciferian Pact

Posted by Quingu on August 17, 2019 at 7:00am 0 Comments

Unforgiving

Posted by Quingu on August 16, 2019 at 4:00pm 2 Comments

The Cherub's Full Moon

Posted by Quingu on August 16, 2019 at 1:00pm 1 Comment

SEPTEMBER AWARENESS

 

Image result for june awareness and causes

Image result for july awareness and causes

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Related image

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for august Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for august World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1–7)

 Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

Image result for september causes and awareness

 

 

© 2019   Created by Bryan   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service